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Xbox One S vs Xbox One: What’s the difference?

Microsoft’s Xbox One S was announced at the E3 this year, just a few weeks ago. This new console from Microsoft will be replacing the Xbox One, and it brings some great potential to console gaming. The users can expect a better performance despite the fact that it is smaller in size than its ancestor.

The leaks of this gadget were roaming around hours before the E3 keynote from Microsoft but most of those leaks were about the size. There is much more to this new console from Microsoft than it meets the eye and we have weighed down the upsides of the offerings of this new gaming console.

Xbox One S – Smaller in size & built in power system

As compared to the old Xbox One, the Xbox One S is about 40% smaller which makes this new console very slim. This much we practically knew as of now on account of all the various leaks, however, it’s awesome news no matter what. Such a minimalization in size is definitely welcomed, as the first Xbox One was kinda bulky and not that good looking. Microsoft has also managed to fit the power brick right inside the console which is another great thing and reduces bulk and cables.

Microsoft has also managed to fit the power brick right inside the console which is another great thing and reduces bulk and cables.

4K and HDR Video support

This is something that was being speculated since a long time. The Xbox One S not only supports 4K video streaming from apps and content providers like Netflix and Amazon Prime, but it also provides a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray player built right into the console.

This is particularly uplifting news for people who use their Xbox for more than just gaming and the starting price point of $299/£249 makes it great worth contrasted with the current Ultra HD players available in the market as of now.

The older Xbox One was definitely made for supporting 4K gaming and video,but the fact that it accompanies a HDMI 1.4a port, which implies it can just yield 4K at 30Hz, which, in turn, is pointless for games and some video. The Xbox One S includes support for HDMI 2.0a, so it now bolsters legitimate 4K at 60Hz yield. HDMI 2.0a provides more profound bandwidth, additionally, takes into consideration High Dynamic Range (HDR) video.

The Game Controller has changed


While the console has changed heavily in terms of design and internal specifications, the redesigned Xbox Wireless Controller has seen some changes of its own. At first glance, you won’t notice much except for the design and the texture. But Microsoft has used better analog controllers to make the controller better in terms of functionality and durability.

Vertical Mounting is now possible

The Xbox One did not come with support for the console to be mounted vertically. It just sat horizontally and look more space that the older Xbox 360. Many people missed the vertical mount and hence, Microsoft decided it was time to bring vertical mount support to Xbox One S. You can get the mount free with the 2TB model and you have to pay $20 extra if you choose to go for other models.

Cost and Accessibility

The 2TB version of the Xbox One S will be sold for $399. There will be both 500GB and 1TB options of the console later on, evaluated at $299 and $349 individually. In comparison, you can get the current Xbox One in different models and options beginning from around £230. The 2TB model will be accessible from August, with the others model options to follow.



The Xbox One S is a clear choice between itself and the older Xbox One. But if you are short on money, you can go for the older model which will continue getting newer games. The newer Xbox One S will only provide you a platform for high graphics based games which many people are looking for nowadays.

The Xbox One S is definitely a better choice between the two if you are looking for a console that supports REAL 4K Ultra HD. HDR gaming may likewise be something you’d like to have for your 4K TV.

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