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Microsoft employees are happier than Apple, thanks to Satya Nadella

An efficient company requires efficient employees – the only way to have efficient employees, is to keep them happy.

Microsoft's Satya Nadella on stage

It turns out; Microsoft employees are very happy after Satya Nadella took over as the CEO of Microsoft. Windows 7 was developed and released under Steve Ballmer’s leadership, and while that leadership did deliver an OS that could take over Windows XP – he wasn’t liked very much within the company.

These findings come from UBS – an analytical firm – with data gathered by Glassdoor, a website where employees and former employees can rate their management.

In Ballmer’s final days, near the end of 2013, Microsoft employees only gave him a 51% approval rating. That’s not only bad for Ballmer but also the company. If a company’s management is seen as weak; it loses the potential to hire crème de la crème – the best of what the industry has on offer.

Satya wins

Fortunately for Microsoft, the reign of the company was handed over to Satya Nadella in February of 2014, and by the end of 2015, his approval rating was hitting 88%.

For the first time since 2012 – when UBS started tracking this data via Glassdoor – Microsoft employees were happier than Apple employees.

For 2016, Microsoft is currently performing 10% higher than the industry average in terms of employee satisfaction – once again, higher than Apple. At the moment, Nadella has 96% approval rating on Glassdoor.

UBS says “the overall results are supportive of our thesis that MSFT has once again become a destination for top tech talent, with annual ratings consistently improving and ahead of peers.”

And it sure seems that way. Under Nadella, Microsoft has made a strong push for the enterprise. His leadership has given Microsoft a refreshed strategy – Windows 10 upgrade was free, Edge took over Internet Explorer as a brand, Windows now has an official Store on the PC and ‘Service Packs’ are now more frequent, and aren’t called service packs.

These changes don’t simply happen without strong leadership – Nadella gave that to Microsoft, and has been compensated well enough for it. Microsoft is now a more agile company, albeit with a few problems here and there.

LinkedIn woes

Microsoft purchased LinkedIn earlier this year, but the LinkedIn employees don’t seem very happy with the deal.

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner used to have a staggeringly high 95% approval rating before the deal, however after it, this has fallen to 85%.

It’s not too bad – but it sure is a decline. Hopefully, LinkedIn’s troubles would disappear once the deal is completed with Microsoft.

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